SAN JUAN CAPISTRO DUAL DIAGNOSIS TREATMENT

Dual diagnosis treatment plans often require more know-how and expertise than what is typically prescribed for mental illnesses. AMFM is devoted to making an accurate diagnosis and planning appropriate treatment programs with our clients.

WHAT DISORDERS ARE DIAGNOSED TOGETHER?

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Illness defines and outlines a myriad of different substance abuse disorders, psychiatric illnesses, and personality disorders. The majority of mental illnesses that get diagnosed comorbidly (together) involve addictions, substance abuse disorders, mood disorders, depressive disorders, and anxiety disorders. Some specific examples of these illnesses include:

  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
  • Panic Disorder
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (a Type of Anxiety Disorder)
  • Alcoholism
  • Drug Addiction (Opioids, Stimulants, and Others)
  • Major Depressive Disorder
  • Bipolar Disorders Including Bipolar I and Bipolar II
  • Borderline Personality Disorder
  • Psychotic Disorders

MARIJUANA-INDUCED PSYCHOSIS

A psychological condition AMFM has observed arising recently is a type of psychotic disorder that is directly linked with marijuana use. Even though many people believe cannabis is completely harmless, this simply isn’t true. Smoking or ingesting cannabis in any fashion has the potential to cause psychotic symptoms in some individuals. 

Although it’s sometimes difficult to distinguish marijuana-induced psychosis from other psychotic disorders or “typical” psychosis (the symptoms can often seem similar), if someone seems to experience their psychotic symptoms after ingesting large amounts of cannabis, this can be a tell-tale sign. Further, delusions of grandeur often categorize “typical” psychosis as opposed to marijuana-induced psychosis.

If one’s psychotic symptoms are highly reduced during periods of abstinence from marijuana, this can also be indicative of marijuana-induced psychosis. Marijuana-induced psychosis tends to elicit more paranoia from an individual, accompanied by visual hallucinations, versus any other psychosis.

WHAT TREATMENTS CAN BENEFIT SOMEONE WITH A DUAL DIAGNOSIS?

The treatments done for dual-diagnosis depend on the specific disorders that are coexisting. For example, conventional treatment modalities for anxiety disorders include Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), group therapies, and sometimes certain types of psychoactive medications (like SSRIs) when deemed necessary. These treatment methods would remain the same for the anxiety disorder, despite whatever other mental illness exists.

Therapy for personality disorders like Borderline Personality Disorder often include treatments like Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) and mood stabilizers. Depressive Disorders consists of treatment methods including Talk Therapy, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT),  medications and other more experiential treatments.

WHAT CAUSES DUAL-DIAGNOSIS?

Dual Diagnoses exists because many mental illnesses can coexist and perpetuate each other. Sometimes, one disease can even contribute to the development of another. 

Also, certain disorders like substance abuse and drug or alcohol addiction have been known to cause depression, anxiety and other mental illnesses. The chemical changes that develop from using drugs and alcohol can be extremely damaging to the brain and the mental stability of specific individuals.

WHAT SHOULD SOMEONE DO WHEN DIAGNOSED WITH MORE THAN ONE MENTAL ILLNESS?

When someone is diagnosed with more than one mental illness, all illnesses must be treated simultaneously and at the same time. That’s why it’s so important to seek the help of psychiatric and mental health professionals. Doctors must be able to properly diagnose where the maladies lie and what specifically needs to be done to treat each of them.